The 9/11 Omission Report

The 9/11 Omission Report – What the Commission Didn’t Report

John Judge (2005)

Film Review

This 2005 presentation by late assassination John Judge focuses on numerous deliberate errors and omissions in the 2004 9/11 Commission Report.

Judge is best known for his investigation into the Jonestown massacre – see Jonestown: The Strange Connection to the Murder of Martin Luther King. He was also a protege of late assassination researcher Mae Brussell (see┬áMae Brussell: Forgotten Superhero).

As a grassroots organizer, he co-founded The Coalition on Political Assassinations. The latter was pivotal in forcing the Clinton administration to release classified JFK assassination documents during the 1990s. After 9/11, he helped found the 9/11 Citizens’ Commission, forced the Bush administration to remove Henry Kissinger from the 9/11 Commission and helped bring its blatant cover-up role to public attention.

In 2005, he had particular concerns about the failure of the Air Force to scramble fighter jets to intercept the hijacked planes (ie follow standard protocol), as well as the absence of any Arab names on any of the flight manifests. It also bothered him that 7 of the 19 alleged suicide hijackers were still alive.

As with most of Judge’s presentations, his experience growing up with a mother who worked in the Pentagon, amidst CIA families in Washington DC, adds significant depth to his perspective. Like his mentor, Mae Brussell, he likes to point out the involvement of presumed 9-11 co-conspirators in prior covert operations, such as Watergate and Irangate.

I found the last segment of this presentation, in which Judge discusses the racist and genocidal nature of the War on Terror, the most interesting. Already in 2005, Judge was talking about fascism and genocide being an inevitable result of post-industrial capitalism. He ends his talk by predicting that genocide will be inevitable as automation reduces the capitalists’ need for workers. He also predicts the global elite will employ racial identification to determine which populations to eliminate first.