RETURN TO EDEN: ‘Agrihoods’ Provide Suburban Living Built Around Community Farms – Not Golf Courses

Source – collective-evolution.com via Rielpolitik

– :“…Every person on the planet can feed themselves with just 100 square feet of well managed land. In 2008, the UN Conference of Trade and development supported organics, saying that organic agriculture can be more conducive to food security in Africa than most conventional production systems, and is more likely to be sustainable in the long term”

‘Agrihoods’ Provide Suburban Living Built Around Community Farms – Not Golf Courses

California’s first farm-to-table new home community just opened. Called “The Cannery,” it’s a residential project designed and put together by The New Home Company. Designed with a seven acre urban farm near the center of downtown Davis, this 100 acre project is considered to be the very first agrihood built on what used to be industrial land.

The community is also home to 547 houses, all of which are energy efficient; each one is solar-powered and comes equipped with electrical car power outlets.

This is great, initiatives like these need to start happening all over the world, and the fact that somebody has now done it shows the rest of the developed world that it’s possible. Instead of building normal residential communities, why not create something sustainable?

Earthships, tiny homes, weatherproof greenhouses, organic farming and more all seem to be part of a larger trend that more and more people are investing in. We are waking up to what’s needed to ensure the prosperity of future generations and the health of the planet. Indeed, this community is focused on organic farming, which is a proven sustainable practice which can only be good for everyone involved.

When it comes to global food sustainability, it’s important to note that various scientists have concluded and demonstrated that organic farming can be sustainable across the globe. The Union of Concerned Scientists reminds us that GM crops are not guaranteed, as promised by company advertising. They still fail to produce promised yields, and farmers are not permitted to save seeds due to the company’s patent. As a result, entire communities can be pushed to the brink of starvation.

Every person on the planet can feed themselves with just 100 square feet of well managed land. In 2008, the UN Conference of Trade and development supported organics, saying that organic agriculture can be more conducive to food security in Africa than most conventional production systems, and is more likely to be sustainable in the long term. You can read that full report HERE.

Growing organic is also important because of all the health issues pesticides have been linked to. These include diseases like autism, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s, cancer, and more […]

 

via RETURN TO EDEN: ‘Agrihoods’ Provide Suburban Living Built Around Community Farms – Not Golf Courses

3 thoughts on “RETURN TO EDEN: ‘Agrihoods’ Provide Suburban Living Built Around Community Farms – Not Golf Courses

  1. “Sounds” good on paper; looks good on the image but why do I feel a great deal of unease when this is presented as “the” solution for the future of mankind? These types of projects have been going on basically forever. They came and went during the great depression; they were much in vogue in the Hippie era but always, it was the well-off who made them happen, usually with secured government grants, and the well-off who participated. Come on folks, how many people can afford a 100 square feet of well managed land? If the land (which is simply not available) was given to them, how soon before it is taken away again? As soon as it is rendered “well managed” and productive? As for being “self sustainable” I think we’ve already talked about the coming crisis in the li-ion rechargeable/storage battery building and replacement. According to this I have enough land right here to be food sufficient and even feed a couple of neighbours. The problem is, they have the same amount of land, all landscaped like mine and to turn that into growing food under the current system would cost much more than to buy the food at the store. Would mine be “safer” to ingest? That too is debatable, depending on where I get my “boosters” like garden blend topsoils to grow above the clay and gravel. Our air pollution is horrendous, our water loaded with chemicals, so what does that do to the crops declared “organic”? What happens next to the tens of thousands who flock here from Mexico and wherever to work the agri business fields and in the corporate food processing plants? Those who work the food stores if all of us “landed gentry” decided to seriously grow our own food? But more to the point, if I spent that much time growing my own food, how would I keep a business going to pay essentials like a mortgage, various serious taxes (I’m holding an invoice for $1700 for this year’s property taxes right now) and gouging insurance fees for house, outbuildings and my business van and trailer? Finally, what happens to the vast majority of chicken-coop and apartment dwellers who have no disposable income to get into the middle class game and no time between juggling three jobs to go and work the soil like a proper “greenie”? Bottom line though, no matter what we do now, we’re looking straight into the snake eyes of entropy and that demon grows in power with every bit of raw energy we extract from the planet, even if our intentions were the purer of the pure. We can go on talking and we can go on experimenting and proposing solutions but the real problem is just beginning to seriously manifest itself as a result of the global population throwing itself into the maw of predatory capitalism and continuing/insisting on believing it will usher in the Age of Aquarius, or if that’s too corny, benevolent global socialism under a central totalitarian “government.” To copy an old meme, we could call it Glozi. I’m sure the agrihoods promoters would find ways to be very comfortable with Glozi and Glozi would tolerate them if they didn’t become hangouts for the poor, destitute and deadbeats/unacceptable of society which Glozi would be quietly rounding up and eliminating.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You makes some really important points, Sha’Tara. I don’t know if you have had a look at the book RetroSuburbia by David Holmgreen, but he makes a lot of the same points you do. His main premise is that a lot of us don’t have the financial resources to buy/build a new eco-home in an intentional community. This means preparing for the eventual economic collapse (which I believe is inevitable) means retrofitting the home and property we have now. The book is free as an ebook, and I found it pretty eye-opening: https://retrosuburbia.com/

    One point I would disagree with is that organic farming conversions are limited to the well-to-do. Urban organic farming has been taken up in a really big way by extremely low income people in abandoned inner city neighborhoods in the US rust belt. Detroit and Milwaukee are the first that come to mind, but I have read about others.

    Liked by 1 person

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