Why US outsourced bat virus research to Wuhan

By Christina LIN | Asia Times | April 22, 2020

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded bat-coronavirus research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China to the tune of US$3.7 million, a recent article in the British newspaper Daily Mail revealed.

Back in October 2014, the US government had placed a federal moratorium on gain-of-function (GOF) research – altering natural pathogens to make them more deadly and infectious – as a result of rising fears about a possible pandemic caused by an accidental or deliberate release of these genetically engineered monster germs.

This was in part due to lab accidents at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in July 2014 that raised questions about biosafety at US high-containment labs.

At that time, the CDC had closed two labs and halted some biological shipments in the wake of several incidents in which highly pathogenic microbes were mishandled by US government laboratories: an accidental shipment of live anthrax, the discovery of forgotten live smallpox samples and a newly revealed incident in which a dangerous influenza strain was accidentally shipped from the CDC to another lab.

A CDC internal report described how scientists failed to follow proper procedures to ensure samples were inactivated before they left the lab, and also found “multiple other problems” with operating procedures in the anthrax lab.

As such in October 2014, because of public health concerns, the US government banned all federal funding on efforts to weaponize three viruses – influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

In the face of a moratorium in the US, Dr Anthony Fauci – the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and currently the leading doctor in the US Coronavirus Task Force – outsourced in 2015 the GOF research to China’s Wuhan lab and licensed the lab to continue receiving US government funding.

The Wuhan lab is now at the center of scrutiny for possibly releasing the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and causing the global Covid-19 pandemic […]

via Why US outsourced bat virus research to Wuhan

7 thoughts on “Why US outsourced bat virus research to Wuhan

  1. Pingback: Why US outsourced bat virus research to Wuhan — The Most Revolutionary Act | © blogfactory

  2. “The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded bat-coronavirus research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China to the tune of US$3.7 million, a recent article in the British newspaper Daily Mail revealed.”
    US$3.7 million, that much was funded by an US Institute for bat-coronavirus research in of all ploaces in Wuhan, China. Why on earth were they so interested in doing this, and why so few people seem to know about this or consider it to be unimportant?

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    • Aunty, it’s my understanding that China was using the the bat retrovirus to try to develop a vaccine for HIV. I am skeptical that US interests were so benign. I’m pretty sure they were keen on find new biological warfare viruses but were stymied when the CDC claused their US labs down.

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  3. Reblogged this on AuntyUta and commented:
    “The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded bat-coronavirus research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China to the tune of US$3.7 million, a recent article in the British newspaper Daily Mail revealed.”
    US$3.7 million, that much was funded by an US Institute for bat-coronavirus research in of all ploaces in Wuhan, China. Why on earth were they so interested in doing this, and why so few people seem to know about this or consider it to be unimportant?

    Like

  4. Pingback: KOMMONSENTSJANE – WHY U.S. OUTSOURCED BAT VIRUS RESEARCH TO WUHAN. | kommonsentsjane

  5. Pingback: KOMMONSENTSJANE – WHY U.S. OUTSOURCED BAT VIRUS RESEARCH TO WUHAN. — kommonsentsjane | FOREVER VICTIMS

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