Study “Confirms That The Full Degree Of Harm Of Antidepressants Is Not Reported”

 

The Facts: Multiple studies outlined in this article indicate a serious issue with the efficacy of antidepressant drugs, and the lengths that pharmaceutical companies go to hide potential dangers. Reflect On: How much science is there really behind the efficacy of antidepressant drugs?

A study published in the British Medical Journal by researchers at the Nordic Cochrane Center in Copenhagen showed that pharmaceutical companies were not disclosing all information regarding the results of their drug trials. Researchers looked at documents from 70 different double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) and found that the full extent of serious harm in clinical study reports went unreported. These are the reports sent to major health authorities like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

study published in the British Medical Journal  by researchers at the Nordic Cochrane Center in Copenhagen showed that pharmaceutical companies were not disclosing all information regarding the results of their drug trials. Researchers looked at documents from 70 different double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) and found that the full extent of serious harm in clinical study reports went unreported. These are the reports sent to major health authorities like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Tarang Sharma, a PhD student at Cochrane and lead author of the study, said:

We found that a lot of the appendices were often only available upon request to the authorities, and the authorities had never requested them. I’m actually kind of scared about how bad the actual situation would be if we had the complete data. (source)

Due to problems with selective reporting, even within CSRs, raw data from clinical drug trials should be preferred when conducting systematic reviews, with CSRs being the next-best option. As SSRIs and SNRIs can have very serious detrimental effects on children and adolescents, far more than previously noted, their use in young people should be reconsidered. In fact, even when considering all ages, placebo seems to be a better pill than an antidepressant drug because the patients weigh the benefits against the harms when they decide whether to stay in a trial or to drop out. (source)

Joanna Moncrieff, a psychiatrist and researcher at University College London, elaborates:

This study confirms that the full degree of harm of antidepressants is not reported. They are not reported in the published literature, we know that – and it appears that they are not properly reported in clinical study reports that go to the regulators and from the basis of decisions about licensing. (source)

Peter Gotzsche, a clinician researcher at Cochrane and the co-author of the study, actually tried to gain access to clinical trial reports almost a decade ago for anti-obesity pills. Unfortunately, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) denied them the reports:

They talked about commercial confidentiality although there was absolutely nothing in these reports that was commercially confidential. We explained that all this secrecy actually cost human lives, but they weren’t interested in that at all. (source)

It took years of requests and complaints for this to happen and, while Gotzsche is pleased they were able to achieve this breakthrough, he reminds us that similar progress has yet to made in the United States. He went on to state that researchers need better access to data from clinical trials to conduct assessments unimpeded by industry influence:

[…]

We really don’t have good enough evidence that antidepressants are effective and we have increasing evidence that they can be harmful. So we need to go into reverse and stop this increasing trend of prescribing [them]. (source)

One of the latest studies published on the subjects titled “Should antidepressants be used for major depressive disorder” published in the British Medical Journal states,

The benefits of antidepressants seem to be minimal and possibly without any importance to the average patient with major depressive disorder. Antidepressants should not be used for adults with major depressive disorder before valid evidence has shown that the potential beneficial effects outweigh the harmful effects.

[…]

Article Source

via Study “Confirms That The Full Degree Of Harm Of Antidepressants Is Not Reported” — NationalAddictionNews.com

2 thoughts on “Study “Confirms That The Full Degree Of Harm Of Antidepressants Is Not Reported”

  1. I didn’t watch the video, but I have long wondered if anti-depressants have much efficacy. Patients who had been on them a long time usually had been through a number of them, because after initial benefit, many seemed to “stop working.” My overall impression was that most of their benefits were the placebo effect, of believing the treatment would help.

    Some people had withdrawal symptoms when they stopped antidepressants. Paxil seemed to be especially hard to get off of. Withdrawal seemed to consist of visual effects, primarily. I wondered if its short half-life was responsible.

    It seems most of the precipitating factors leading to depression were not amenable to anti-depressants: things like financial or relationship problems, poor coping skills, physical problems, life transitions–like “empty nest” or menopause–were situations medications couldn’t touch, but psychotherapy could help.

    I’ve often wondered if psychiatry should be its own specialty, especially now that talk therapy has been shifted to psychologists and social workers, since that’s what insurance pays for. Psychiatrists in most places have become mere prescription-writing machines, but that limited role is dull as dirt, and fraught with litigation potential. “Most people” are on multiple medications, these days, not just psychiatric meds, and it’s impossible to know the cumulative side effects of poly-pharmacy. The 15-minute sessions don’t even begin to allow all the time needed just to update med lists, much less listen to patients’ concerns or educate them on the drugs they do take.

    Like

  2. I never found SSRIs to work very well, though I did find Wellbutrin, Effexor, tricyclics and MAOIs to work in some patients. SSRI’s seem to work better in anxiety than in depression, but only if patients can tolerate their side effects. I probably got the best results from MAO inhibitors, if I could persuade patients to take them. And also surprisingly from 150-300 mg lithium (using lithium citrate) a day, especially in patients with a history of hypomania. Most of these patients were on Medicaid. I would have prescribed omega 3 oils for them, but Medicaid doesn’t cover it.

    The reviews I’ve seen indicate that only 50% of patients with major depression achieve full recovery with medication. This is certainly consistent with my experience. They also indicate only a third (which is the same as placebo) respond at all to SSRI’s.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.