The Politics of Asbestos: Banned in EU, But Not China, Russia, Brazil or US

Deadly Asbestos

DW (2019)

Film Review

This documentary is about the international asbestos industry and its aggressive penetration of developing countries following the EU’s decision to ban it in 1998. The first study linking asbestos to lung cancer and mesothelioma was published in 1964. Asbestos also causes a chronic (eventually fatal) lung condition known as asbestosis. Sadly, as with smoking and lead poisoning, it took decades of sustained organizing to get western governments to acknowledge the fatal health consequences of asbestos exposure. The US enacted a “partial ban” on asbestos in 1989.*

Because mesothelioma can result from a brief single exposure to asbestos fibers, EPA rules regarding asbestos removal from old buildings are far more stringent. In fact, an entire industry has evolved around asbestos removal.**

The filmmakers focus primarily on the Belgian asbestos manufacturer Etex-Eternit (aka Everest) and its expansion into India in the 1990s. India has been a primary industry target of the industry, owing to its lax regulation of asbestos manufacture, use and disposal.

Asbestos sheets are sold widely in India for use as walls and roofs in makeshift shacks. Over 100,000 Indians develop asbestosis annually.

India has more than 50 asbestos manufacturing plants. Filmmakers visit an asbestos factory Everest built in 1995 and sold to an Indian family in 2002. In addition to filming a 600,000 square meter asbestos waste dump, they also visit a makeshift clinic treating thousands of local residents for asbestos-related problems. They also talk with Indian lawyers and activists who are bringing a lawsuit against Everest in Belgium.

The film concludes by looking at World Health Organization efforts to institute a global ban on asbestos. Brazil, China, and Russia, which still mine asbestos, continue to vociferously block the ban.

Last year, the Trump EPA approved new rules that soften regulations against asbestos use in the US.  In response, one Russian asbestos manufacturer now proudly displays features Trump’s image on all their products.


* History of EPA asbestos regulation

  • 1989 Partial Ban on the manufacture, import, processing, and distribution of some asbestos-containing products. EPA also banned new uses of asbestos which prevent new asbestos products from entering the marketplace after August 25, 1989. These uses remain banned. The April 2019 final rule does not provide a way for these uses to return to the marketplace.
  • April 2019 Final Rule to ensure that asbestos products that are no longer on the market cannot return to commerce without the Agency evaluating them and putting in place any necessary restrictions or prohibiting use. The uses covered under this rule were not already prohibited under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and could have returned to the market at any time.
  • Risk evaluation of asbestos under TSCA. EPA is reviewing a handful of very limited, still ongoing uses of asbestos. The evaluation of the risks associated with ongoing uses of asbestos is required under TSCA section 6. If EPA finds unreasonable risk, the Agency will take prompt action to address those risks.

** See https://www.epa.gov/asbestos

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “The Politics of Asbestos: Banned in EU, But Not China, Russia, Brazil or US

  1. Thanks for this. I had forgotten the Trump-Russia asbestos. One of the biggest players has been Canada and McGill University did a study to whitewash the industry ca 2012. There was a big scandal re Canadian exports to Haiti after the earthquake. Apparently it is still allowed for nuclear in Canada. http://www.canadianasbestosexports.ca I don’t know how many know the role that Montreal played in the Manhattan Project either. University of Montreal (a private previously Roman Catholic Uni) was involved but I suspect that there is a tunnel under the mountain connecting U of Montreal with McGill’s Rutherford lab https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_particle#History_of_discovery_and_use Somehow Canada always gets a pass, even though the economy seems almost entirely based upon resource extraction – something that it’s easy not to notice in towns, just like you can live in Paris and never see a nuclear power station, but stumble upon them in rural areas.

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  2. Thanks for the comment and links, Mining Awareness. Extremely enlightening. I tend to be very sensitive about asbestos-related issues. When I was in Seattle, I worked with a woman who was mercilessly stalked and harassed over a lawsuit she and her husband filed against Johns Manville over his asbestos related death. I think they call it gang stalking now.

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