California Moves to Ban For-Profit Prisons, Including Immigrant Jails

Incarceration at for-profit prisons in California peaked at about 7,000 prisoners in 2016, but state officials have been shifting prisoners to publicly run prisons in recent years.

AGR Daily News

California Moves to Ban For-Profit Prisons, Including Immigrant Jails

This comes as California lawmakers passed a bill last month that would ban private prisons statewide, a major blow to the for-profit prison industry in the U.S. that is deeply entangled in immigration detention. The legislation also orders the closure of four ICE prisons that can jail up to 4,500 immigrants. The bill is currently awaiting the signature of Governor Gavin Newsom, who said in his January inaugural address that California should “end the outrage of private prisons once and for all.” Incarceration at for-profit prisons in California peaked at about 7,000 prisoners in 2016, but state officials have been shifting prisoners to publicly run prisons in recent years. Hamid Yazdan Panah, an immigration attorney with the California Collaborative for Immigrant Justice, joins us for a conversation about the bill and immigrant detention in California.

via Truthout California Moves to Ban…

View original post 5 more words

2 thoughts on “California Moves to Ban For-Profit Prisons, Including Immigrant Jails

  1. Well, this should be interesting. I think for-profit prisons are an anathema, so I’m glad California is taking this step. I suspect it will get a lot of resistance from the federal government, as California is bucking the feds on many fronts lately.

    The article focuses on ICE detention centers, but it sounds like the legislation refers to all for-profit prisons.

    I’ve read recently that for-profit prisons were started in 1980, and soon after that, the incarceration rate began going up. Also, private prison stocks went up immediately after Trump was elected. Now we know why.

    Like

  2. I am also quite pleased, Katherine. As I understand, many of the contracts states have with private prisons charge States a penalty if they fail to satisfy a minimum occupancy rate – this would partly explain the big increase in prison numbers.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.