Japan’s population is shrinking by a quarter of a million people every year

This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum.

Author: Emma Charlton, Senior Writer, Formative Content

How do you stop your country’s population shrinking?

While some obvious suggestions may spring to mind, coming up with policy responses is not often simple. Nowhere is this felt more acutely than in Japan, where the population declined by more than a quarter of a million last year.

That’s the equivalent of three times the amount of people it takes to fill London’s Wembley Stadium in just 52 weeks, and it’s showing no signs of slowing. The total population was 126 million in the year to October 2018, a fall of 0.2% compared with a year earlier, and the eighth consecutive drop.

Japan’s demographic challenges are well documented. As well as having one of the fastest-shrinking populations in the world, ageing is a key issue. Taken together, these problems underscore the challenges facing the country’s government and raise questions about the policies that might help, including loosening immigration rules and improving labour-force participation […]

via Japan’s population is shrinking by a quarter of a million people every year — The European Sting – Critical News & Insights on European Politics, Economy, Foreign Affairs, Business & Technology – europeansting.com

1 thought on “Japan’s population is shrinking by a quarter of a million people every year

  1. Sorry, I don’t get it. Why would you want to stop a population from shrinking? Japan already faces great difficulty housing and feeding its current population. With the planet Earth facing increasing scarcity of fertile soil, fresh water, and increasing CO2 pollution, extinction of other species and exploitation of third world and indigenous populations, it seems to me that developed countries like Japan need to reduce their populations if we’re to have any chance of saving this planet.

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