Study Correlates Heavy Smartphone Use in Teens with Greater Unhappiness

This study, gathering data from over one million 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-graders, showed teens who spend more time on social media, gaming, texting and video-chatting on their phones aren’t as happy as those who played sports, went outside and interacted with real human beings.

Journal of People

A Journal of People report

Too much Smartphone use makes teens unhappy, finds a new research from San Diego State University. Teens glued to their Smartphones and other devices are unhappier than those spending less time on digital media, the research finds.

The study gathered data from over one million 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-graders in the U.S. showing teens who spent more time on social media, gaming, texting and video-chatting on their phones were not as happy as those who played sports, went outside and interacted with real human beings.

View original post 1,897 more words

6 thoughts on “Study Correlates Heavy Smartphone Use in Teens with Greater Unhappiness

  1. I am shocked, SHOCKED, I say! Seriously? They needed to fund a study to come to the conclusion that technology is not making people happy? Facebook and Twitter and video games cannot take the place of real, face-to-face human contact. We are social creatures who need human interaction and no machine or gadget can take the place of that. We were nurtured in a womb and that means something. We were not concocted in a petri dish. If people were happy because of all the gadgets they buy, there would be no drunks or drug addicts because everyone would just be so happy over all the technology they buy every single day. I simply cannot wrap my head around the fact that a study was necessary to come to the conclusion that gadgets are not making us happy, but are imperiling our health by making us more isolated than ever from each other while making us think they are bringing us closer together. SIGH!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Of course, you are absolutely right, Shelby. I think both of us have been harping on the unhealthy aspects of digital madness for some time now. Unfortunately I think a lot of people (especially politicians) are conditioned to disregard what’s right in front of their noses unless some scientist has proved it with a study. When we go down to our district council to make submissions on the harmful effect of fracking, flouoride, seismic blasting (on whales) and a whole host of other indecencies, they don’t want to listen unless we come armed with a bunch of studies we can point to.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This unhappiness among our youth brought to mind the following quote from Desiderata by Max Ehrmann (1948):
    “If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.”

    Digital social media expose our youth 24/7 to all the amazing things their “friends” are doing and accumulating. Envy and a sense of inadequacy or failure can be debilitating, even for us adults.

    Like

    • Rosaliene, your comment is right on the money! Hear! Hear! And for some reason, I cannot find the ‘like’ button because believe me, I would be ‘liking’ all up and down on your straight to the point and right on time comments!

      Like

    • Too right, Rosaliene. I was in a woman’s group a few years ago where some of the younger women talked about the loss of self-esteem they sometimes felt when they compared other women’s photos and life events to their own. It was so sad when they talked about how addicting it was – even though it really made them feel bad.

      Like

  3. Pingback: Study Correlates Heavy Smartphone Use in Teens with Greater Unhappiness – Puppet Master's Slave Market

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.