The world’s first major city to run out of water may have just over three months left

Unless Cape Town adopts widespread rationing, taps “will be turned off” on April 22, 2018, because there will be no more water to deliver.

The Secular Jurist

It’s the height of summer in Cape Town, and the southwesternmost region of South Africa is gripped by a catastrophic water shortage. Unless the city adopts widespread rationing, the government says, the taps “will be turned off” on April 22, 2018, because there will be no more water to deliver.

This would make Cape Town the first major city in the world to run out of water, according to Anthony Turton, a professor at the Centre for Environmental Management at the University of the Free State in South Africa, who spoke to the New York Times. “It’s not an impending crisis—we’re deep, deep, deep in crisis.” The shortage is the result of a multi-year drought.

Continue reading:  The world’s first major city to run out of water may have just over three months left

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6 thoughts on “The world’s first major city to run out of water may have just over three months left

  1. Coming to a country, state and city near you! Soon, this will be the norm. Some places are experiencing drought while others are underwater. I heard the other day that somewhere, they’re starting to build floating houses and in some countries, homes have already been built off the ground on poles.

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    • This summer we’re in a severe drought in New Plymouth this year. It normally has the climate of a temperate rain forest – and for the second year in a row we have water restrictions on watering our gardens. I’ve dug some swales to catch rainwater in my veggie garden, in addition to rigging up a grey water system to catch water from my sinks, bathtub and washing machine.

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  2. Good question, UZA. Sounds like there is a lack of good information sharing. Living here in New Plymouth, I’ve learned a lot from the permaculture community about using no till farming (drilling seeds into existing cover crops), shrubs and “chop and drop” mulches to reduce water loss. Traditional agriculture where you turn over an entire field before you plant is a real set up for water loss.

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