Dirt: the Movie

Dirt: The Movie

Bill Benenson and Gene Rosow (2009)

Film Review

This documentary focuses on the rapid destruction of the planet’s topsoil, with its dire implications for food production and human survival. Through a combination of industrial farming, deforestation, urbanization and extractive mining, humankind has destroyed one-third of the world’s topsoil in a hundred years.

The film begins with a basic introduction to on the abundant microbial life that characterizes healthy topsoil. Plowing, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and heavy pesticide and herbicide use render soil infertile by destroying these microorganisms. Deforestation hastens the process by destroying deep root systems that protect against nutrient runoff. The productive farmland that isn’t wrecked by industrial farming and deforestation is paved over as cities expand or destroyed by fracking, mountaintop removal and strip mining. This voracious greed for new fossil fuels benefits a few hundred people and carries immense costs for the rest of us.

The film depicts quite eloquently the western slash and burn mentality that approaches food production like running a factory. Extracting a quick profit is all that matters. There is no planning whatsoever for food security, much less the needs of future generations. You clear cut a forest, plant acres of a single crop (an open invitation to pests) and pour on industrial fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides. In three to four years you have depleted the soil, and you cut down another forest.

Dirt: the Movie also poignantly portrays the link between environmental destruction and human degradation. It’s always the poorest and most disempowered who have their land destroyed by multinational corporations. Rapid desertification in Africa and India is forcing thousands of subsistence farmers to migrate to city slums – and Haitian mothers to make dirt cookies to ward of their children’s hunger pains.

Meanwhile increasing desertification (from a combination of deforestation and industrial farming) in Africa and India and the thousands of farmers forced to migrate to city slums when their land becomes useless. The film also emphasizes the link between environmental destruction and human degradation. It’s always the poorest and most disempowered who have their land destroyed by multinational corporations. The most heart breaking scene depicts Haitian mothers making dirt cookies to ward off their children’s hunger pains.

Water mismanagement also plays a major role in desertification. Because they have paved over their rivers, Los Angeles spends billions of dollars from as far away as Wyoming – and millions more managing rainwater runoff. Liberating their rivers would solve both problems at a fraction of the cost.

Significantly the main voices featured in the film are those of women of color: the late Kenyan environmentalist Wangari Mathai, who won a Nobel Prize for founding the Green Belt tree-planting movement, Indian environmentalist and organic farming advocate Vandana Shiva and Greening the South Bronx founder Majora Carter (see Greening the South Bronx). In addition to championing urban agriculture and green roof projects in the South Bronx, Carter has helped establish a prison greenhouse and organic farm at Rikers Island prison and the Green Team. The latter is a project that allows ex-cons to use the skills they have learned in tree planting, urban agriculture plots and New York’s first green roof* business.

*A green roof is a living roof partly or completely covered with vegetation, to optimize energy conservation and minimize water runoff.

5 thoughts on “Dirt: the Movie

  1. Monsanto, Fracking and universal war profiteering, is it not the same thing ? War against humanity, war against nature. The motive is the same short term profits and sustained profit vis a vis monopolizing markets. The victims ( 99.9% of the global population) and the Perpetrators are the same-the 1/10th % investor-ruling class that share in the wealth of the imperial Zionist too big to fail banks and the military industrial complex.The greatest item to be commoditized now is fresh water, and you will see the price climb, and it still will not be fresh as there is no truth in product labeling. The royal corporate aristocracy has a vested interest in poisoning it’s enemies and consolidating it’s command and control. Send these sociopaths to Mars, tell them it’s made of gold.

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  2. P.S. a gallon of Milk is almost twice as expensive as gasoline, and nearly equally toxic. There is no supply and demand market dynamics at work here- it is deliberately manipulated to destroy the Russian economy. The point is all markets are manipulated by the ruling class to serve their profit-and or geo-political objectives.

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    • I really like the way David Graeber defines capitalism: a gigantic credit/debt apparatus pumping maximum labor out of human beings to produce an ever expanding quantity of material goods. Police, prisons and state sanctioned slavery are essential tools in achieving the phenomenal productivity needed to finance a political system based on continual war.

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